Let’s talk about: Hallmark’s Royal Romance Movies

Once upon a time… most stories about the Prince who falls in love with a town girl start this way. They fall in love against all odds. And the ending is another memorable line: …they lived happily ever after. Almost every girl, at some point, had that dream. Like in the Cinderella story, she would meet “Prince Charming”, and he’d marry her and live happily ever after.

In real life, it’s not that simple. The chances of meeting and marrying a true Prince or heir to any monarchy are slim. According to the article “What Are Your Chances of Meeting a Prince”, written by Dan Newman for LA Times, the chances are 1 in 285,000. Yes, someone did the calculation. Check the article here https://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-newman-odds-of-becoming-a-princess-20180520-story.html

It does happen. Once in a while, a lady with no rank in monarchy will meet and marry a member of a royal family. Look at Letizia Ortiz, who married Prince Felipe, now King and Queen of Spain. Of course, she was a TV news reporter, so she had a good chance of meeting Felipe or someone who knew him. Well, I was dreaming of meeting him, but he lived in Spain, I lived in Puerto Rico. We both speak Spanish, that’s all I could think we have in common. Then he met Letizia, they married, and now she is Queen of Spain.

Then, look at Kate Middleton, wife of Prince William, now Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in England. Of course, she had a good chance of marrying Prince William, since they went to school together. And look at American star Megan Markle, who recently married Prince Harry, brother of Prince William, now Duke and Duchess of Sussex in England. Harry is number six in line of succession to the British throne. Of course, she is a public figure, she has a friend who is also a friend of Harry and thought they should meet. They met, they dated, and they got married.

Neuschwanstein Castle in Germany.
Picture used for the promotion of Royal Hearts, Hallmark Channel movie

I didn’t watch those kind of movies when I was growing up, or read those kind of stories. But at some point in my young life I thought I’d meet a guy who would “save” me. By the time I graduated high school, I was more ready to leave the house and be on my own, than to marry a guy.

Now, as an adult, I get to enjoy many romance stories, thanks to cable television and Hallmark Channel. Hallmark Channel was launched in 2001 by Crown Media Holdings, Inc. Same corporation that already owns the most popular greeting cards company in the United States. I like to remind everyone, that even though I love the movies, I’m just a fan. I have no rights or access to any production or merchandise. None. But if you are interested, you may visit the website www.hallmarkchannel.com. I check the Hallmark Channel page every day! (I am a #HallmarkNerd!).

Their formula is to present light romance movies, some mixed with comedy (called rom-coms), where the main couple always end up together and “live happily ever after”. These movies are light, and clean, in the sense that there are no intimacy scenes, no foul language, or no nudity.

I’ve selected the magic world of royal romances for this post. The prince that falls in love with the lady, the lady that didn’t know he was a prince. Or the lady who knew the guy was a prince or king, but couldn’t help but fall in love, and of course, the guy falls in love with the her. There’s almost always a villain, another lady interested in the Prince, or another guy interested in the lady, a Queen Mom or King Dad, and one of my favorite parts, a royal ball or dance.

Cindy Busby as Princess Kelly in
Royal Hearts, picture courtesy Hallmark Channel

Up until now, 2019, there are 14 Hallmark movies with royalty romance theme. I made the list in chronological order (by premiere date), because it’s too difficult for me to list by favorite. I like them all. Well, there are a few that are not so favorites, but I still watch them. For more information on the movies, visit www.hallmarkchannel.com website.

  • 1- Smooch (2011) starring Kiernan Shipka as Zoe, Kellie Martin as her mother Gwen, and Simon Kassianides as Prince Percy, an English royal. They met in San Francisco, California, USA. This movie was filmed in San Francisco, California, and Detroit, Michigan, USA. I haven’t watched this one, but found it listed in Hallmark movies. In the U.S., it’s shown as part of the new streaming service Hallmark Movies Now.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 2- A Princess for Christmas (2011) starring Katie McGrath as Jules Daly, Sam Heughan as Prince Ashton, and special guest Roger Moore as Duke Edward of Castlebury Hall, Ashton’s father. Charlotte Salt plays Lady Arabella Marchand du Belmon. Jules is from Buffalo, New York. Jules and Prince Ashton met in Castlebury Hall. This movie was filmed in various castles around Bucharest, Romania. (In the U.S., this movie is part of the programming shown at Hallmark Movies and Mysteries, another Crown Media station).
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 3- A Royal Christmas (2014) starring Lacey Chabert as Emily, and Stephen Hagan as Prince Leopold, Leo, of Cordinia. Special guest Jane Seymour is Queen Mother Isadora. Emily and Leo met in college in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Emily’s hometown). They both traveled to Cordinia. This movie was also filmed at various castles in Bucharest, Romania.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 4- Once Upon a Holiday (2015) starring Briana Evigan as Princess Katie of Mountsaurai, and Paul Campbell as Jack. Princess Katie and Jack met in New York City, New York, USA. This is the first movie where the girl is the Princess and they’re not in her country (until the end of the movie).
Image courtesy
Hallmark Channel
  • 5- Crown for Christmas (2015) starring Danica McKellar as Allie, and Rupert Penry-Jones as King Maximillian, Max, of Winshire. Also stars Ellie Botterill as the King’s daughter, mischievous Princess Theodora, and Alexandra Evans as Countess Lady Celia. Allie and King Max met in New York, but they traveled to Winshire. This movie was also filmed at various castles in Bucharest, Romania, and parts in Slovenia.
Images courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 6- My Summer Prince (2016) starring Taylor Cole as Mandy, and Jack Turner as Prince Colin of Edgemere. Guest star is Lauren Holly who plays Deidre Kelly, Mandy’s boss. Vanessa Angel plays Queen Mom Rosalind of Edgemere. Mandy and Prince Colin met, and story takes place, in Greenbriar, Idaho, USA. They do travel to Edgemere in Europe for the Queen’s Jubilee Dance. The movie was filmed in Utah, USA.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 7- A Royal Winter (2017) starring Merritt Patterson, as Maggie, and Jack Donnelly as Prince/King Adrian of Calpurnia. Samantha Bond plays Queen Mother Beatrice. Maggie and Prince Adrian met in Calpurnia. Maggie is from Manhattan, New York, USA. She traveled to Calpurnia, where she met Prince Adrian. This movie was filmed in various locations in Romania, including Bucharest.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 8- Royal New Year’s Eve (2017) starring Jessy Schram as Caitlyn, Sam Page as Prince Jeffrey, Hayley Sales as Lady Isabelle Collins, and special guest Cheryl Ladd as Abigail Miller, Caitlyn’s boss. Gerard Plunkett plays King Richard, Jeffrey’s father. Caitlyn and Prince Jeffrey met in New York City, New York, USA. This is the only movie that doesn’t specify where the Prince is from, only that he’s from a small country in Europe. (I did verify with the writer Rick Garman).
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel

  • 9- Royal Matchmaker (2018) starring Bethany Joy Lenz as Kate, and Will Kemp as Prince Sebastian of Voldavia. Simon Dutton plays King Father Edward. Kate is from New York City, NY, USA. She travels to Voldavia, where she meets Prince Sebastian. This movie was filmed mainly at Peles Castle, and around other locations in Bucharest, Romania.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 10- Royal Hearts (2018) Cindy Busby plays (Princess) Kelly, and Andrew Cooper is Alex. Guest star James Brolin plays Hank, Kelly’s father, who inherited the title of King of Merania. Lachlan Nieboer plays handsome villain King Nikolas of Angosia, a neighbor country. Kelly and Hank are from Montana, USA. They both traveled to Merania, where Kelly and Alex meet. This movie was filmed in Bucharest and Transylvania, Romania.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 11- Once Upon a Prince (2018) starring Megan Park as Susanna, and Jonathan Keltz as Prince/King Nathaniel, Nate, of Cambria. Sarah Botsford plays Queen Mother (apparently with no name, I couldn’t find it). Susanna and Prince Nate met in St. Simons, Georgia, USA, then traveled to Cambria. This movie was filmed in Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 12- Royally Ever After (2018) starring Fionna Gubelmann as Sara, and Torrance Coombs plays Prince Daniel of St. Ives. Carmen Du Sautoi plays Queen Mother Patricia, Barry McGovern is King Father Edmond, and Rebekah Wainwright plays Princess Fiona, Daniel’s sister. Sara and Prince Daniel met in New Jersey, USA, then they traveled to St Ives. This movie was filmed mostly in Ireland.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 13- Christmas at the Palace (2018) starring Merritt Patterson as Katie, Andrew Cooper as King Alexander of San Senova, and India Fowler as his daugher, Princess Christina. This is the second Hallmark royal movie for both star actors. Katie is from New Jersey, USA. She traveled to San Senova, where they met. This movie was filmed in Bucharest, Romania.
Image courtesy Hallmark Channel
  • 14- A Winter Princess (2019) starring Natalie Hall as Princess Carlotta, Carly, of Lanovia, and Chris McNally as Jesse. Mackenzie Gray is King Father Kristof, and Casey Masterson is Prince Gustav, Carly’s twin brother. Carly and Jesse met at a ski resort in Aspen, Colorado, USA. This is the second movie with a princess as main character, and they’re outside her country. The movie was filmed at the Big White Ski Resort and other parts of Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.
Image courtesy
Hallmark Channel

I hope Hallmark Channel Network will continue making this type of romance movies. I do enjoy and appreciate knowing that the couple will be together at the end, no matter the misunderstandings, no matter the villains along the way, no matter the circumstances. Love conquers all, well, at least in the movies.

Prince Sebastian (Will Kemp) confessing to Kate (Bethany Joy Lenz)
she’s the one who gives him butterflies.
Scene from Royal Matchmaker, Hallmark Channel original movie

I know, we all know, that real life is not a happily ever after, at least not all the time. But I know that having a positive attitude, working on communicating, and resolving disagreements helps you have a happier cohabitation. But, as a woman, my advice to all of you reading is: work on it. Have you heard of the saying “happy wife, happy life”? Yes, you have to work on it. Time for my tacita de café. Salud!

Para versión en español, vea https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/09/07/hablemos-sobre:-las-peliculas-de-romance-y-realeza-de-hallmark

Mi hermoso Puerto Rico: faros históricos

Puerto Rico se considera como una isla pequeña, pero de seguro está llena de muchos lugares hermosos y diversos para visitar. Desde playas impresionantes, hasta montañas y bosques increíbles, hasta edificios y lugares históricos. Este es el noveno artículo que escribo, hay mucho para ver y explorar en esta hermosa Isla. Esta vez, quiero contarles sobre los faros históricos de Puerto Rico.

Un faro es una estructura construída cerca de la orilla del mar o de la costa para ayudar con la navegación marítima costera. Debe tener al menos una torre y alguna forma de luz que brille en la distancia. Hay diferentes tipos de luces, considerando la distancia que se quiere alcanzar y las señales que hacen. Su propósito es guiar a los marineros a la tierra, estableciendo sus posiciones y ser utilizados como guías para llegar a su destino. Incluso en los días modernos, con toda la tecnología y los medios digitales disponibles, muchos marineros prefieren usar los faros como guía. Para obtener más información sobre los faros y cómo funcionan, consulte este artículo (escrito en Inglés) por Ian Clingan para Encyclopædia Britannica https://www.britannica.com/technology/lighthouse.

Faro del Castillo San Felipe del Morro
San Juan, Puerto Rico

En Puerto Rico, el gobierno español construyó faros a fines del siglo XIX. Cuando España tomó posesión de la Isla, después de llegar en 1493, comenzaron a construir fortalezas o fortínes para protegerse de los ataques de otros países y piratas. Los faros fueron construídos en lugares estratégicos, para proteger todas las costas de enemigos. También se utilizaron para guiar a salvo a sus propios barcos hasta el puerto.

En ese momento, se consideraba que Puerto Rico estaba en una posición estratégica en el Caribe. Sigue estando en esa posición. Esa fue la razón por la que los recién formados Estados Unidos de América (EE. UU.) Querían tomar posesión de la Isla. Puerto Rico es la más pequeña de las Antillas Mayores, después de Cuba y La Española, pero la más grande de las Antillas Menores. También se encuentra a la entrada del Golfo de México.

Después de 1898, cuando Puerto Rico se convirtió en posesión de los Estados Unidos de América, el sistema de faros se convirtió en responsabilidad de la Guardia Costera de los Estados Unidos. La Guardia Costera ha sido responsable de la instalación de sistemas automáticos de iluminación. En 1981, los faros de Puerto Rico fueron incluídos como monumentos históricos, ya que se incluyeron en el Registro Nacional de Lugares Históricos en Washington D.C. En 2000, se incluyeron en el Registro Nacional de Propiedades Históricas de Puerto Rico. Para obtener más información sobre la historia de los faros en la Isla, consulte este artículo publicado por La Fundación Puertorriqueña de las Humanidades https://enciclopediapr.org/encyclopedia/acerca-de-los-faros-de-puerto-rico/.

Hay 15 faros alrededor de la Isla. Todos fueron construídos con un plan para coordinar sus posiciones. Solo unos pocos siguen funcionando, algunos de ellos se han deteriorado con el tiempo. Pero el gobierno local y federal, y los voluntarios locales, han estado trabajando para restaurarlos y mantenerlos abiertos al público. Algunos de ellos tienen pequeños museos, para que los visitantes puedan conocer su historia. Algunos están cerrados, pero aún son visibles para los visitantes.

Faro del Castillo San Felipe del Morro
San Juan, Puerto Rico

Comenzando en el norte, está el faro del Castillo San Felipe del Morro, ubicado en San Juan. Fue el primero construído en 1846. Este fue el principal puesto de defensa, en la bahía de San Juan, para proteger la Isla. San Juan fue considerado uno de los puertos más importantes de todo el imperio español en América. En 1898, después del ataque de los Estados Unidos de América, el faro fue destruído. Su reconstrucción se completó en 1908.

Este faro se encuentra dentro de las instalaciones del fuerte El Morro, que es administrado por el Servicio de Parques Nacionales de los Estados Unidos. Hay una tarifa de entrada por visitante, pero la tarifa cubre la visita a todo el edificio. Esta es una visita obligada si estás en el área de San Juan y quieres saber más sobre la historia de Puerto Rico.

Faro Punta Morrillos, Arecibo, Puerto Rico

Continuando por el norte, siguiendo hacia el oeste, el próximo faro es Punta Morrillos, ubicado en Arecibo. Fue construído alrededor de 1897-98 y fue el último construído bajo el gobierno español. En 1994, se completó un proyecto de restauración y se agregaron un área de museo más un parque recreativo. Combina historia con diversión, haciendo que los niños jueguen alrededor de un barco pirata y una cueva. Hay una tarifa de entrada por visitante y una tarifa de estacionamiento por automóvil.

Faro Punta Borinquen, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
Ruinas del faro original
Punta Borinquen, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

En la esquina noroeste de la Isla, en Aguadilla, se encuentra el faro de Punta Borinquen. El faro original fue construído en 1889, pero en 1918 fue destruído por un terremoto. Partes de las ruinas del faro original aún permanecen en el área. La Guardia Costera de los EE. UU. Construyó un faro nuevo en 1922, utilizando los mismos detalles decorativos que el original. Lamentablemente, este faro está cerrado a los visitantes. El acceso solo está permitido a los empleados. Pero los visitantes aún pueden visitar las instalaciones cercanas.

Faro de Punta Higüera, Rincón, Puerto Rico
Cortes
ía de Francisco Alvarado/Marilyn Alvarez
Faro de Punta Higüera, Rincón, Puerto Rico
Foto de álbum personal

Continuando hacia el sur, en el oeste, se encuentra el faro de Punta Higüera en Rincón. Fue construído originalmente en 1892, y también fue destruído por el terremoto de 1918. La Guardia Costera de los Estados Unidos también construyó uno nuevo aquí en 1921. Está en una zona agradable, puedes caminar en el área, y no hay costo para acceder el estacionamiento.

Faro de la Isla de Mona,
Mona, Puerto Rico

Todavía en el oeste, está el faro de la isla de Mona. Mona es una isla deshabitada al oeste de Puerto Rico. Es una reserva natural administrada por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales. Bueno, generalmente hay al menos una persona que vive temporalmente en la isla: el empleado asignado a la oficina de la reserva. También muchos biólogos vienen aquí para investigar.

La construcción de este faro comenzó en 1888 y se completó alrededor de 1898. Es el faro más grande y el único construído en hierro y acero. Desafortunadamente, el faro se ha deteriorado y no está en servicio. Hay una señal de luz provisional que se agregó detrás de la estructura.

Faro Los Morrillos, Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

En la esquina suroeste de la Isla, en Cabo Rojo, está el faro de Los Morrillos. Este fue construído en 1882. Fue restaurado en 2000 y aún funciona. Ayuda a los barcos a ingresar y navegar a través del Pasaje de Mona, área entre Puerto Rico y República Dominicana, junto con el faro de la isla de Mona. Este está abierto a los visitantes, y hay una tarifa de entrada. La mayor parte de la información proporcionada a los visitantes está en español.

Faro de la Bahía de Guánica, Guánica, Puerto Rico

Continuando en el sur, ahora siguiendo hacia el este, está el faro de la Bahía de Guánica. En esta área, está la Reserva Natural La Parguera y el Bosque Seco Guánica. Fue construido en 1892. Su luz está desactivada desde 1950. Lamentablemente, este faro está deteriorado y ha sufrido vandalismo.

Faro de Cayo Cardona, Ponce, Puerto Rico

Todavía en el sur, hacia el este, en Ponce, está el faro de Cayo Cardona. Fue construído en 1889. Cayo Cardona es una pequeña isla deshabitada ubicada a aproximadamente 1 milla al sur de Ponce. Este faro sirve de guía a los barcos al puerto de Ponce. Se agregó un sistema de iluminación automática en 1962. No hay acceso para los visitantes, pero todavía funciona.

Faro de Caja de Muerto, Ponce, Puerto Rico

El faro de Caja de Muerto también se encuentra en el sur, cerca de Ponce. Es otra isla deshabitada frente a la costa de Ponce. Hay un ferry desde Ponce que lleva a los visitantes a la isla, ya que hay muchas playas abiertas para los visitantes. El faro fue construído en 1887. En 1945, se agregó un sistema de iluminación automático. Este faro continúa en servicio.

Faro de Punta de las Figuras, Arroyo, Puerto Rico

Todavía en el sur, el próximo faro es Punta de las Figuras en Arroyo. Fue construído en 1893, y luego fue abandonado en 1938. Con los años, se deterioró y fue destrozado muchas veces. Entre 2002 y 2003, el gobierno de Puerto Rico lo restauró. En 2017, sufrió daños cuando el huracán María azotó la Isla. Se está trabajando para restaurar esos daños.

Faro de Punta Tuna, Maunabo, Puerto Rico

En la esquina sureste de la Isla, en Maunabo, está el faro de Punta Tuna. Fue construído en 1893. Está situado en la cima de una colina, con vistas a la reserva natural de Punta Tuna y la playa. En 1989, obtuvo un sistema de iluminación automático. Este todavía está en servicio.

Faro de Las Cabezas de San Juan
Fajardo, Puerto Rico

En la esquina noreste de la Isla, en Fajardo, está el faro de Las Cabezas de San Juan. Este se encuentra en la Reserva Natural Las Cabezas de San Juan. Su construcción comenzó en 1877 y finalmente se completó en 1882. Es el segundo más antiguo después del faro de El Morro. Su estructura ha sufrido algunos daños por los huracanes a lo largo de los años. Obtuvo un sistema de iluminación automático en 1975. Una restauración se completó en 1991 y el faro aún está en servicio.

Faro de Punta Mulas, Vieques, Puerto Rico

La isla de Vieques, al este de Puerto Rico, tiene dos faros en su área. Uno es el faro de Punta Mulas. Se encuentra en el norte de la isla, cerca del puerto de Isabel II. Fue construído en 1895, para ayudar a guiar a los barcos a través del Paso de Vieques, zona entre las islas de Vieques y Culebra, y Puerto Rico. En 1992, fue restaurado y abierto como museo. Con los años, ha sufrido daños y permanece cerrado al público.

Faro de Punta Ferro, Vieques, Puerto Rico

El segundo en la isla de Vieques es el faro de Punta Ferro, ubicado en el sur de Cayo Verdiales. Fue construído en 1896. Su propósito también era ayudar a guiar a los barcos a través del Paso de Vieques. Estuvo en uso hasta 1926, cuando fue abandonado. Con los años, ha sufrido deterioro.

Faro de Isla Culebrita, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Hay un faro más en el este de Puerto Rico. El faro de la isla Culebrita se encuentra en el sureste de la isla, una de las pequeñas islas de Culebra. Este fue construído en 1886. Estuvo activo hasta 1975, cuando la Guardia Costera de los Estados Unidos finalmente lo cerró. En 1964, se instaló una luz guía cerca, con un faro de luz solar que todavía funciona. Las instalaciones del faro están cerradas porque están en malas condiciones, debido al daño sufrido, ya que muchos huracanes han afectado el área desde que se construyó el faro.

Disfruto haciendo estos escritos, como disfruto descubriendo muchos lugares diferentes para visitar en Puerto Rico. Lo confieso, sólo he visitado algunos de estos faros. Pero su belleza y detalles arquitectónicos siempre me han atraído. Sería un día de viaje divertido e interesante, el planear visitar la mayor cantidad posible. O incluso el disfrutar visitando diferentes áreas, donde se puede combinar una visita a un bosque, una reserva, una playa y un faro alrededor de la Isla. Espero que puedas visitar todos estos lugares. De seguro yo planeo hacerlo. Estoy orgullosa de mi Isla del Encanto. Para todos ustedes fuera de Puerto Rico, los invito a visitarnos pronto. Es hora de mi tacita de café. ¡Salud!

For English version, see https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/08/25/my-beautiful-puerto-rico:-historic-lighthouses/

My Beautiful Puerto Rico: Historic Lighthouses

Puerto Rico is considered a small island, but it sure is full of so many beautiful and diverse places to visit. From breathtaking beaches, to amazing mountains and forests, to historical buildings and locations. This is the ninth article I write, so much there is to see and explore in this beautiful Island. This time, I want to tell you about Puerto Rico’s historic lighthouses.

A lighthouse is a structure built near the shore or the coast to help with maritime coastal navigation. It should have at least one tower and some form of light that flashes out in the distance. There are different type of lights, considering the distance wanted to be reached, and the signals they make. Its purpose is to guide sailors to land, by establishing their positions and to be used as guides to get to their destination. Even in modern days, with all technology and digital media available, many sailors still prefer to use lighthouses as a guide. For more information about lighthouses and how they work, check this article by Ian Clingan for Encyclopædia Britannica https://www.britannica.com/technology/lighthouse.

Castillo San Felipe del Morro Lighthouse,
San Juan, Puerto Rico

In Puerto Rico, lighthouses were built around the end of the nineteenth century by the Spaniard government. As Spain took possession of the Island, after arriving in 1493, they started building forts to protect themselves from attacks by other countries and by pirates. The lighthouses were built in strategic places, to protect all coasts of enemies. They were also used to guide their own ships safe to port.

At that time, Puerto Rico was considered to be in a strategic position in the Caribbean. It still is. That was the reason the newly formed United States of America (U.S.) wanted to take possession of the Island. Puerto Rico is the smallest of the Greater Antilles, after Cuba and Hispaniola, but the biggest of the Lesser Antilles. It’s also located at the entrance of the Gulf of México.

After 1898, when Puerto Rico became a possession of the United States of America, the lighthouse system became a responsibility of the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard has been responsible for installing automatic lighting systems. In 1981, the lighthouses of Puerto Rico were listed as historic monuments, as they’ve been included in the National Register of Historic Places in Washington D.C. In 2000, they were included in the National Register of Historic Properties of Puerto Rico. For more information about the history of the lighthouses in the island, check this article published by The Puerto Rico Endowment for the Humanities https://enciclopediapr.org/en/encyclopedia/about-the-lighthouses-of-puerto-rico/.

There are 15 lighthouses around the Island. All were built with a plan to coordinate their positions. There are only a few still functioning, some of them have been deteriorating over time. But local and federal government, and local volunteers, have been working on restoring and keeping them open to public. Some of them have small museums onsite, so visitors can get to know their history. Some are closed, but still visible for visitors.

Castillo San Felipe del Morro Lighthouse,
San Juan, Puerto Rico

Starting in the north, there’s the Castillo San Felipe del Morro lighthouse, located in San Juan. It was the first one built in 1846. This was the main defense post, being in the San Juan bay, to protect the Island. San Juan was considered one of the most important ports in all of the Spanish empire in America. In 1898, after the attack by the United States of America, the lighthouse was destroyed. Its rebuilt was completed in 1908.

This lighthouse is located within El Morro fort facilities, which is administered by the United States National Park Service. There’s an entrance fee per visitor, but the fee covers the visit to the whole building. This is a must-do visit, if you are in the San Juan area, and you want to know more about Puerto Rico history.

Punta Morrillos Lighthouse, Arecibo, Puerto Rico

Continuing through the north, moving to the west, the next lighthouse is Punta Morrillos, located in Arecibo. It was built around 1897-98 and it was the last one built under the Spanish government. In 1994, a restoration project was completed and a museum area plus a recreational park were added. It combines history with fun, having children play around a pirate’s ship and a cave. There’s an entrance fee per visitor, and a parking fee per car.

Punta Borinquen Lighthouse, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
Ruins of original lighthouse
Punta Borinquen, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

In the northwest corner of the Island, in Aguadilla, there’s Punta Borinquen lighthouse. The original lighthouse was built in 1889, but in 1918 it was destroyed by an earthquake. Parts of the ruins of the original lighthouse still remain in the area. The U.S. Coast Guard built a new one in 1922, using the same decorative details as the original. Unfortunately, this lighthouse is closed to visitors. Access is only permitted to employees. But visitors are still allowed to visit the surrounding premises.

Punta Higüera Lighthouse, Rincón, Puerto Rico
Courtesy of Francisco Alvarado/Marilyn Alvarez
Punta Higüera Lighthouse, Rincón, Puerto Rico
Photo from personal album

Continuing south, in the west, there’s Punta Higüera lighthouse in Rincón. It was originally built in 1892, and was also destroyed by the 1918 earthquake. The U.S. Coast Guard also built a new one here in 1921. It’s in a nice area, you can walk around, and there’s no cost to access the parking.

Mona Island Lighthouse
Mona, Puerto Rico

Still in the west, there’s the Mona Island lighthouse. Mona is an uninhabitated island to the west of Puerto Rico. It’s a nature reserve managed by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resource. Well, there’s usually at least one person living temporarily in the island: the employee assigned to the reserve’s office. Also many biologists come here to do research.

This lighthouse’s construction started in 1888 and was completed around 1898. It’s the biggest, and the only one built of iron and steel. Unfortunately, the lighthouse has been deteriorating and it’s not in service. There’s a provisional light signal that was added behind the structure.

Los Morrillos Lighthouse, Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

In the southwest corner of the Island, in Cabo Rojo, there’s Los Morrillos lighthouse. This one was built in 1882. It was restored in 2000 and is still functioning. It helps ships entering and navigating through the Mona Passage, area between Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic, along with the Mona Island lighthouse. This one is open to visitors, and there’s an entrance fee. Most of the information provided to visitors is in Spanish.

Guánica Bay Lighthouse, Guánica, Puerto Rico

Continuing in the south, now moving east, there’s the Guánica Bay lighthouse. In this area, there’s La Parguera Nature Reserve, and the Guánica Dry Forest. It was built in 1892. Its light has been deactivated since 1950. Unfortunately, this one is deteriorated and has suffered from vandalism.

Cardona Key Lighthouse, Ponce, Puerto Rico

Still in the south, moving east, in Ponce, there’s the Cardona Key lighthouse. It was built in 1889. Cardona Key is a small, uninhabited island located about 1 mile south of Ponce. It guides ships to the Port of Ponce. An automatic illumination system was added in 1962. There’s no access for visitors, but this one is still functioning.

Caja de Muerto Lighthouse, Ponce, Puerto Rico

Caja de Muerto (Coffin Island) lighthouse is also in the south, near Ponce. It’s another uninhabited island off the coast of Ponce. There’s a ferry from Ponce that takes visitors to the island, as there are many beaches open for visitors. The lighthouse was built in 1887. In 1945, an automatic illumination system was added. This lighthouse continues in service.

Punta de las Figuras Lighthouse, Arroyo, Puerto Rico

Still in the south, next lighthouse is Punta de las Figuras in Arroyo. It was built in 1893, and then it was abandoned in 1938. Over the years, it deteriorated and was vandalized many times. Between 2002-2003, the government of Puerto Rico restored it. In 2017, it suffered damages when Hurricane María hit the Island. They are working on restoring those damages.

Punta Tuna Lighthouse, Maunabo, Puerto Rico

In the southeast corner of the Island, in Maunabo, there’s the Punta Tuna lighthouse. It was built in 1893. It’s situated on top of a hill, overlooking the Punta Tuna Nature Reserve and beach. In 1989, it got an automatic illumination system. This one is still in service.

Las Cabezas de San Juan Lighthouse
Fajardo, Puerto Rico

In the northeast corner of the Island, in Fajardo, there’s Las Cabezas de San Juan lighthouse. This one is in the Las Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve. Its construction started in 1877, and was finally completed in 1882. It’s the second oldest after the El Morro lighthouse. Its structure has suffered some damage from hurricanes through the years. It got an automatic illumination system in 1975. A restoration was completed in 1991, and the lighthouse is still in service.

Punta Mulas Lighthouse, Vieques, Puerto Rico

The island of Vieques, to the east of Puerto Rico, has two lighthouses in its area. One is the Punta Mulas lighthouse. It’s located in the north of the island, near the Port of Isabel II. It was built in 1895, to help guide ships through the Vieques Passage, zone between the islands of Vieques and Culebra, and Puerto Rico. In 1992, it was restored and opened as a museum. Over the years, it has suffered damage and it remains closed to public.

Punta Ferro Lighthouse, Vieques, Puerto Rico

The second one in the island of Vieques is the Punta Ferro lighthouse, located in the south on Verdiales Key. It was built in 1896. Its purpose was also to help guide ships through the Vieques Passage. It was in use until 1926, when it was abandoned. Over the years, it has suffered from deterioration.

Culebrita Island Lighthouse, Culebra, Puerto Rico

There’s one more lighthouse in the east of Puerto Rico. The Culebrita Island lighthouse is located in the southeast of the island, one of the small islands of Culebra. This one was built in 1886. It was active until 1975, when the U.S. Coast Guard finally closed it. In 1964, a guiding light was installed nearby, with a solar powered light beacon that’s still functioning. The lighthouse installations are closed because they’re in poor condition, due to damage suffered as many hurricanes have affected the area since the lighthouse was built.

I enjoy doing this writings, as I enjoy discovering many different places to visit in Puerto Rico. I confess, I’ve only visited a few of these lighthouses. But their beauty and architectural details have always attracted me. It’d make for a fun and interesting traveling day, planning to visit as many as possible. Or even enjoy visiting different areas, where you can combine a visit to a forest, a reserve, a beach and a lighthouse around the Island. I hope you get to visit all these places. I sure plan to do so. I’m proud of my Enchanted Island. For all of you outside of Puerto Rico, I invite you to go visit soon. Time for my tacita de café. Salud!

Para versión en español, vea https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/08/25/mi-hermoso-puerto-rico:-faros-historicos/

Mi hermoso Puerto Rico: Playas únicas y especiales

Puerto Rico tiene tantos lugares hermosos e increíbles para visitar. La belleza de la naturaleza se expone aquí en sus montañas, bosques, lagos, ríos y playas. Se puede apreciar en cualquier época del año. Con el clima cálido y la brisa fresca, las playas son una de las atracciones más populares de nuestra isla. Los puertorriqueños la llamamos con mucho orgullo “Isla del Encanto”.

He escrito sobre las hermosas playas alrededor de la Isla, y ha sido una tarea difícil elegir sólo diez en cada costa. Para esta publicación, elegí diez más de estos lugares increíbles, tan únicos que quiero contarte todo sobre ellos.

Primero, déjame contarles sobre las bahías bioluminiscentes en Puerto Rico. La bioluminiscencia es una reacción química muy interesante de algunos organismos vivos que produce luz. Lo usan como mecanismo de defensa, para confundir a los depredadores, o para atraer y cazar presas, o incluso para atraer compañeros. Para obtener más información, consulte este artículo de la Revista National Geographic (en Inglés) https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/bioluminescence/

Pez rape de “Buscando a Nemo”, imagen courtesía de Pixar Animation Studios/Walt Disney Pictures

Algunos animales que son buenos ejemplos de este tipo de reacción son:

  • el pez rape: lo usa para atraer presas, el pez que vemos en Buscando a Nemo, película de Disney/Pixar 2003;
  • el calamar o pulpo “vampiro”: lo usa para confundir a los depredadores, en lugar de tinta oscura producen un moco bioluminiscente; y,
  • la luciérnaga, en Puerto Rico también conocida como cucubano: la usa para atraer compañeros (¡esas pequeñas y lindas luciérnagas!).
Luciérnagas de noche

Este fenómeno ocurre más comúnmente en lagunas o bahías de aguas cálidas cerca del océano. Hay cinco bahías bioluminiscentes en todo el mundo, tres de ellas en Puerto Rico. En Puerto Rico, esto es causado principalmente por microorganismos, llamados dinoflagelados, que reaccionan para confundir a los depredadores. Esta reacción, que produce una luz brillante, se aprecia mejor por la noche.

Bahía Mosquito, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Una de estas bahías es la bahía Mosquito. Está ubicada en la costa sur de la isla-municipio de Vieques. Vieques está ubicado al este de Puerto Rico, y se puede llegar en un bote, un ferry o en un avión. Esta bahía se considera la más brillante. Hay muchas compañías de guías turísticos que ofrecen a los visitantes un recorrido por la bahía para ver de cerca este fenómeno.

Laguna Grande,
Fajardo, Puerto Rico

La segunda bahía es Laguna Grande. Está en la costa noreste de Puerto Rico, en el pueblo de Fajardo. Está ubicada en el área de la Reserva Natural Cabezas de San Juan. Hay muchos árboles de mangle que rodean la laguna. Debido a que está en la reserva, se requieren reservaciones. Se ofrecen diferentes recorridos para los visitantes, incluídos recorridos nocturnos.

Bahía La Parguera,
Lajas, Puerto Rico

La tercera es la bahía de La Parguera. Está en el suroeste, en el pueblo de Lajas. Está ubicada en la Reserva Natural La Parguera, y cerca del Bosque Seco Guánica. Al igual que Laguna Grande en Fajardo, hay muchos árboles de mangle en el área. Se considera la menos brillante, pero aún tiene cierta actividad bioluminiscente.

Consulten este artículo de “The Culture Trip” para obtener más información sobre las increíbles playas bioluminiscentes de Puerto Rico (en inglés) https://theculturetrip.com/caribbean/puerto-rico/articles/a-guide-to-puerto-ricos-magical-glow-in-the-dark-beaches/.

También hay algunas hermosas e interesantes playas en los muchos islotes y cayos alrededor de la Isla. Puerto Rico es considerado un archipiélago (un grupo de islas muy juntas). Incluye 143 pequeñas islas, islotes y cayos. He seleccionado algunos de ellas para escribir, ya que son algunas de las playas más bellas de Puerto Rico. Como no hay instalaciones en la mayoría de estas islas, se aconseja a los visitantes que traigan agua, comida, repelente de insectos, bloqueador solar y bolsas de basura.

Isla de Cabra, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico,
Courtesía de Francisco Alvarado/Marilyn Alvarez

Comenzando en el norte, está la Isla de Cabra, ubicada en el pueblo de Toa Baja, cerca del área de San Juan. Hay un pequeño fuerte en este islote, el Fuerte San Juan de la Cruz, que fue uno de los fuertes construidos por los españoles cuando gobernaban la Isla. Allí se ha construído una zona de juegos infantiles para visitantes con niños. También hay mesas de picnic y baños públicos. Hay una pequeña zona de playa, pero no es apta para bañarse. Hay una tarifa de entrada por vehículo.

Cayo Icacos, Fajardo, Puerto Rico
Courtesía Francisco Alvarado/Marilyn Alvarez

En el noreste, cerca de Fajardo, encontramos la isla de Icacos. Está a unas 3 millas de Puerto Rico, y puedes llegar en barco. Es administrada por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico, y es muy popular como destino de buceo y esnórquel. La arena es de color blanco claro y el agua es cristalina. No hay baños en esta isla. Se pueden traer alimentos y refrigerios para picnics.

Isla Palomino, Fajardo, Puerto Rico

La isla Palomino también se encuentra en el noreste, cerca de Fajardo y cerca de Icacos. Es un pequeño paraíso con arena blanca clara y agua cristalina. Parte de la isla es de propiedad privada de un complejo hotelero cercano y, por lo tanto, está reservada para sus huéspedes. Pero todavía hay áreas accesibles para los visitantes públicos. Hay un restaurante en esta isla, pero está en el área reservada para los huéspedes del hotel. Como Icacos, la arena es de color blanco claro y el agua es cristalina.

Vista de isla Caja de Muerto desde Ponce

Moviéndonos hacia el sur, encontramos la isla Caja de Muerto (ataúd) cerca del pueblo de Ponce. Este nombre se le dio porque, desde lejos, la isla parece un ataúd. Esta isla también es administrada por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales. Hay algunas rutas para excursionar alrededor de la isla. Hay cinco playas con nombre en la isla: Pelícano, Playa Larga, Playa Chica (también conocida como Carrucho), Playa Ensenadita (también conocida como Pocitas) y Playa Blanca (también conocida como Guardacostas).

Playa Pelícano en isla Caja de Muerto, Ponce, Puerto Rico

Todas esas playas son buenas para bañarse, como siempre, tomando todas las precauciones necesarias. Hay baños con inodoros de compostaje y áreas para cambios de ropa. Hay gazebos con mesas de picnic. También hay un centro de visitantes, un centro educativo y una oficina para el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales.

Isla Guilligan, Guánica, Puerto Rico

Cayo Aurora, mejor conocido como la Isla de Guilligan, se encuentra en el suroeste, cerca de Guánica. Está a una milla de tierra firme. Forma parte de la Reserva Natural de La Parguera y es manejada por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales. Al ser parte de la reserva, encontrarás muchos árboles de mangle alrededor. Hay muchos lugares para bañarse en la playa en toda la isla. Hay mesas de picnic y barbacoas. No hay baños, pero hay inodoros de compostaje.

Isla Mata La Gata, Lajas, Puerto Rico

Hay otro hermoso cayo pequeño cerca de Guilligan’s, conocido como Isla Mata La Gata (un nombre complicado, ya que significa “Gata la planta” o “Mata a la gata”). Este también está en el suroeste, cerca de Lajas, cerca de Guánica. Es parte de la Reserva Natural La Parguera. Las playas son seguras para bañarse, pero siempre tomen las precauciones necesarias. Esta isla tiene mesas de picnic, gazebos y barbacoas. Los baños aquí tienen inodoros de compostaje, duchas y áreas para cambios de ropa.

Playa en la isla de Mona, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico

La isla de Mona está en el oeste, cerca de Mayagüez. Se encuentra a unas 41 millas al oeste de Puerto Rico y a unas 38 millas al este de República Dominicana. También es manejada por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales como Reserva Natural Isla Mona. Parte de esta reserva son dos islas más pequeñas cercanas: Monito y Desecheo. Las playas más populares son Sardineras, Pájaros y Arenas. También hay un extenso sistema de cuevas en la isla.

Acantilados, Isla Mona, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico

Hay algunos acantilados (riscos) impresionantes, mejor apreciados a medida que te acercas a la isla en barco. Las vistas de las ballenas jorobadas y los delfines son comunes aquí. Hay una gran población de tortugas que viene a esta isla para anidar, especialmente la tortuga carey. Los biólogos vienen a menudo a investigar aquí. Hay baños, pero el consumo de agua es limitado. Se permite acampar, pero se requieren permisos.

Para obtener más información sobre estos hermosos lugares y algunas otras reservas naturales administradas por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales (el documento está en español), consulte aquí http://drna.pr.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/NANP_Folleto.pdf. (Nota: como advertencia, si abre este documento en su teléfono, tiene 56 páginas. Se abre como un “pdf” en Adobe Reader).

Todos estos hermosos lugares son parte de las muchas maravillas de la naturaleza de Puerto Rico. Tenemos el privilegio de tener todas estas playas e islas extraordinarias y únicas. Espero que todos estos lugares estén bien cuidados y preservados, para que las generaciones futuras puedan tener acceso a disfrutar de todo lo que nuestra Isla tiene para ofrecer. Tan pronto como regrese a Puerto Rico, estaré visitando algunos de estos lugares. Estoy muy orgullosa de poder compartir todo esto con ustedes. Hora de mi tacita de café. ¡Salud!

For English version, see https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/08/11/my-beautiful-puerto-rico:-unique-and-special-beaches/

My Beautiful Puerto Rico: Unique and Special Beaches

Puerto Rico has so many beautiful and amazing places to visit. The beauty of nature is exposed here in its mountains, forests, lakes, rivers, and beaches. It can be appreciated any time of the year. With the warm weather and cool breeze, beaches are one of the most popular attractions in our Island. We Puerto Ricans proudly call it “Isla del Encanto” or “Enchantment Island”.

I’ve written about the beautiful beaches around the Island, and it has been a hard task to pick only ten on each coast. For this post, I picked ten more of these amazing places, so unique that I want to tell you all about them.

First, let me tell you about the bioluminescent bays in Puerto Rico. Bioluminescence is a very interesting chemical reaction from some living organisms that produces light. They use it as a defense mechanism, to confuse predators, or to attract and hunt prey, or even to attract mates. For more information, check this article from National Geographic Magazine https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/bioluminescence/

Angler Fish from “Finding Nemo”, image courtesy of Pixar Animation Studios/Walt Disney Pictures

Some animals that are good examples of these type of reaction are:

  • the angler fish: uses it to attract prey, the fish we see in Finding Nemo, 2003 Pixar/Disney movie;
  • the “vampire” squid: uses it to confuse predators, instead of dark ink they produce a bioluminescent mucus; and,
  • the firefly, also known as lightning bug: uses it to attract mates (those cute little fireflies!).
Fireflies at night

This phenomenon happens most commonly in warm water lagoons or bays near the ocean. There are five bioluminescent bays around the world, three of them are in Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico, this is mostly caused by micro-organisms, called dinoflagellates, reacting to confuse predators. This reaction, producing a bright light, is better appreciated at night.

Mosquito Bay, Vieques, Puerto Rico

One of these bays is Mosquito Bay. It’s located in the south coast of the island-municipality of Vieques. Vieques is located to the east of Puerto Rico, and you have to get there on a boat, a ferry, or on a plane. This bay is considered the brighter one. There are many tour guide companies offering visitors a tour to the bay to see this phenomenon up close.

Laguna Grande,
Fajardo, Puerto Rico

The second bay is Laguna Grande (Big Lagoon). It’s in the northeast coast of Puerto Rico, in the town of Fajardo. It’s located in the Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve area. There are many mangrove trees surrounding the lagoon. Because it’s in the reserve, reservations are required. Different tours are offered for visitors, including night tours.

La Parguera Bay, Lajas, Puerto Rico

The third one is La Parguera Bay. It’s in the southwest, in the town of Lajas. It’s located in the La Parguera Nature Reserve, and near the Guánica Dry Forest. Like Laguna Grande in Fajardo, there are many mangrove trees in the area. It’s considered the least bright, but still have some bioluminescent activity in it.

Check this article from “The Culture Trip” for more information about Puerto Rico’s amazing bioluminescent beaches https://theculturetrip.com/caribbean/puerto-rico/articles/a-guide-to-puerto-ricos-magical-glow-in-the-dark-beaches/.

There are also some interesting beautiful beaches around the many islets and cays around the Island. Puerto Rico is considered an archipielago (a group of island close together). It includes 143 small islands, islets and cays. I’ve selected some of them to write about, as they are some of the most beautiful beaches around Puerto Rico. As there are no facilities in most of these islands, visitors are advised to bring water, food, insect repellent, sunblock, and garbage bags for trash.

Isla de Cabra, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico,
Courtesy of Francisco Alvarado/Marilyn Alvarez

Starting in the north, there’s Isla de Cabra (Goat’s Island), located in the town of Toa Baja, near the San Juan area. There’s a small fort in this islet, the Fort San Juan de la Cruz, that was one of the forts built by the Spaniards when they governed the Island. A kid’s play zone has been built there for visitors with children. There are also picnic tables and public restrooms. There is a small beach area, but is not suitable for bathing. There’s an entrance fee per vehicle.

Icacos Cay, Fajardo, Puerto Rico
Courtesy of Francisco Alvarado/Marilyn Alvarez

In the northeast, near Fajardo, we find Icacos Island. It’s about 3 miles from mainland, and you have to get there by boat. It’s managed by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources of Puerto Rico, and is very popular as a scuba diving and snorkeling destination. The sand is of light white color and the water is crystal clear. There are no restrooms on this island. Food and coolers can be brought over for picnics.

Palomino Island, Fajardo, Puerto Rico

Palomino Island is also in the northeast, near Fajardo and close to Icacos. It’s a small paradise with light white sand and crystal clear water. Part of the island is privately owned by a nearby hotel resort, and thereby reserved for their guests. But there are areas still accessible to public visitors. There’s a restaurant on this island, but is in the reserved area for the hotel guests. As Icacos, the sand is of light white color and the water is crystal clear.

View of Caja de Muerto Island from Ponce

Moving to the south, we find Caja de Muerto (Coffin) Island near the town of Ponce. This name was given because, from afar, the island looks like a coffin. This island is also managed by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources. There are some hiking trails around the island. There are five named beaches on the island:  Pelícano, Playa Larga, Playa Chica (also known as Carrucho), Playa Ensenadita (also known as Pocitas), and Playa Blanca (also known as Coast Guard).

Pelícano Beach at Caja de Muerto Island, Ponce, Puerto Rico

All those beaches are good for bathing, as always, taking all necessary precautions. There are restrooms with composting bathrooms and changing rooms. There are gazebos with picnic tables. There’s also a visitor’s center, an educational center, and an office for the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources.

Guilligan’s Island, Guánica, Puerto Rico

Aurora Cay, best known as Guilligan’s Island, is in the southwest, near Guánica. It’s about a mile from mainland. It’s part of the La Parguera Nature Reserve and it’s managed by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources. Being part of the reserve, you’ll find a lot of mangrove trees around. There are many bathing spots all around the island. There are picnic tables and barbecue pits. There are no restrooms, but there are composting toilets.

Mata La Gata Island, Lajas, Puerto Rico

There’s another beautiful small cay nearby Guilligan’s, known as Mata La Gata Island (a tricky name, as translation means “Cat the Plant” or “Kill the Cat”). This one is also in the southwest, near Lajas, close to Guánica. It’s part of the La Parguera Nature Reserve. Beaches are safe for bathing, but always taking necessary precautions. This island has picnic tables, gazebos, and barbecue pits. The restrooms here have composting restrooms, showers and changing rooms.

Beach in Mona Island, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico

Mona Island is in the west, near Mayagüez. It’s located about 41 miles west of Puerto Rico, and about 38 miles east of Dominican Republic. It’s also managed by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources as Mona Island Nature Reserve. Part of this reserve are two more smaller islands nearby: Monito and Desecheo. Most popular beaches are Sardineras, Pájaros and Arenas. There’s also an extensive cave system in the island.

View of cliffs, Mona Island, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico

There are some impressive cliffs, better appreciated as you approach the island on boat. Sights of humpback whales and dolphins are common here. There’s a big turtle population that comes to this island to nest, especially the hawksbill sea turtle. Biologists come often to do research here. There are restroom facilities, but water consumption is limited. Camping is allowed, but permits are required.

For more information on these beautiful places, and some others nature reserves managed by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (document is in Spanish), check here http://drna.pr.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/NANP_Folleto.pdf. (Note: As a warning, if you open this document on your phone, it has 56 pages. It opens as a “pdf” in Adobe reader.)

All these beautiful places are part of Puerto Rico’s many nature wonders. We are privileged to have all these extraordinary and unique beaches and islands. I hope that all these places would be well taken care of, and preserved, so future generations can have access to enjoy all that our Island has to offer. As soon as I go back to Puerto Rico, I’d be visiting some of these places. I’m so proud to be able to share all of these with you. Time for my tacita de café. Salud!

Para versión en español, vea https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/08/11/mi-hermoso-puerto-rico:-playas-unicas-y-especiales/

Mi hermoso Puerto Rico: Playas de Culebra y Vieques

La hermosa isla de Puerto Rico se encuentra en una ubicación increíble y única en el área del Caribe. El Océano Atlántico bordea su costa norte, y el Mar Caribe bordea su costa sur. Tiene un clima cálido, sin nieve y unas vistas impresionantes.

Aunque Puerto Rico se considera una isla, en realidad es un archipiélago (un grupo de islas cercanas). Incluye 143 pequeñas islas, islotes y cayos. Las islas de Mona y Monito están en el oeste, y las islas de Vieques, Culebra, Culebrita y Palomino están en el este.

Las islas de Culebra y Vieques son más grandes que las otras islas. Ambas son pueblos, con gobierno municipal. Culebra tiene una población de aproximadamente 1,800 y Vieques tiene aproximadamente 9,300 residentes, según los datos del Censo 2010. Todas las demás islas más pequeñas no tienen población. Culebra es más pequeña que Vieques, y se encuentra al norte de Vieques.

Tengo que confesar que nunca he estado en Culebra o Vieques. Sí, tengo la intención de visitar pronto. A medida que sigo aprendiendo sobre estas dos hermosas islas y sus playas, más me interesa.

Bien, entonces, ¿cómo llegamos allí? Bueno, hay dos ferries que salen todos los días a ambas islas, uno es un ferry para pasajeros solamente y otro es un ferry de carga. El ferry de carga es para automóviles, pero principalmente para residentes, porque las compañías de alquiler en Puerto Rico imponen restricciones para asegurar los automóviles que se transportan fuera de la isla grande de Puerto Rico.

Para tomar el ferry, hay un puerto en el pueblo de Ceiba. Los ferries solían prestar servicios desde Fajardo, pero las operaciones se trasladaron a Ceiba en 2018. Viajan aproximadamente 4 veces al día a ambas islas. También hay vuelos chárter o alquilados que van a ambas islas, ya que ambas tienen aeropuertos.

Estas dos islas tienen algunas de las playas más bellas del Caribe, pero también del mundo. He elegido diez playas, cinco de cada isla, para este artículo. Esta no ha sido una tarea fácil. ¡Todas sus playas son hermosas!

Mapa de Culebra, courtesía de Google Earth Maps

Culebra está a unas 22 millas al este de Fajardo. Es mejor conocida como “la Isla Chiquita”. Hay alrededor de 1,800 residentes que viven en esta isla, según datos del Censo de 2010. Hay alrededor de 111 playas con nombre en su costa. La costa está bordeada por el océano Atlántico. La isla tiene un pequeño aeropuerto y un puerto para el transporte en ferry por mar todos los días. Para consultar sobre los requisitos y permisos para acampar, comuníquese con la Autoridad de Conservación y Desarrollo de Culebra.

Para más información, visite https://enciclopediapr.org/encyclopedia/municipio-de-culebra/, información provista por la Fundación Puertorriqueña de las Humanidades. Consulte también este excelente artículo sobre las playas de Culebra de The Travel Channel aquí (en inglés) https://www.travelchannel.com/interests/beaches/articles/culebra-island-puerto-rico.

Playa Flamenco, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Playa Flamenco es la más bella de todas en Culebra, y posiblemente de todo Puerto Rico. Está en el lado noroeste de la isla. Ha sido seleccionada varias veces como una de las 10 mejores playas del mundo. Su arena es de un color blanco claro y su agua es cristalina. Es tan clara que se puede ver una variedad de tonos azul-verdes durante todo el día. Hay baños y duchas disponibles. Se permite acampar en esta playa (se requiere permiso).

Playa Tamarindo Grande, Culebra, Puerto Rico

La playa Tamarindo Grande se encuentra en el lado suroeste, muy cerca de Flamenco. Se toma unos 20 minutos caminando de una playa a la otra. Están separadas por la Península de Flamenco, donde se encuentra la Reserva Nacional de Culebra. Hay un refugio de vida silvestre en el área de la reserva, protegido por el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales. Esta playa tiene algunas áreas en la arena de color blanco claro y algunas de color amarillo dorado. Hay muchas piedras en toda la playa, debido a la abundancia de arrecifes de coral en esta área. El agua es cristalina. La bahía de Luis Peña es visible desde esta playa.

Playa Datiles, Culebra, Puerto Rico

La playa Datiles es una joya escondida. Está en el lado suroeste de la isla. No es una playa popular, pero es hermosa para visitar. Tiene una orilla poco profunda, el agua se mantiene mayormente tranquila casi sin olas, por lo que es perfecta para que los niños se bañen. La arena es muy clara, casi de color blanco, y el agua es cristalina. También es perfecta para acampar, pero no hay baños aquí.

Playa Zoni (Soni), Culebra, Puerto Rico

La playa Zoni (también conocida como Soni) se encuentra en el lado noreste de Culebra. Desde Zoni, las islas de St. Thomas y Tortola son visibles en la distancia. Tiene muchas palmeras altas para disfrutar de la sombra. No hay baños en esta playa. Puede haber áreas restringidas durante la temporada de anidación de tortugas. Las olas aquí son más activas que en otras playas, por lo que nadar no es muy seguro. No hay salvavidas (socorristas) alrededor, así que siempre proceda con precaución.

Playa Tortuga, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Playa Tortuga se encuentra en el lado noroeste de Culebrita, el cayo más grande de Culebra. Se llama tortuga debido a las muchas tortugas que se ven en esta playa, desde la tortuga espalda de cuero hasta la tortuga carey, que vienen aquí para anidar o alimentarse. La playa es hermosa, como todas las playas de Culebra, la arena es de color blanco claro y el agua es cristalina. No hay baños en este cayo. Hay un faro que permanece cerrado por reparaciones. Hay muchas rutas de excursiones abiertas al público, pero no hay salvavidas (socorristas) ni personal de seguridad aquí.

Mapa de Vieques, courtesía de Google Earth Maps

Vieques está a unas 8 millas de Ceiba. Es mejor conocida como “la Isla Nena”. Hay alrededor de 9,300 residentes que viven en esta isla, según datos del Censo 2010. Hay alrededor de 172 playas con nombre en su costa. La costa está bordeada por el mar Caribe. También hay una bahía bioluminiscente en Vieques, Bahía Mosquito, sobre la que escribiré en otra publicación. La isla también tiene un pequeño aeropuerto y un puerto para el transporte en ferry por mar todos los días.

La Marina de los EE. UU. tenía instalaciones y áreas de práctica de bombardeo en más de dos tercios de la tierra en la isla hasta 2003. Esa tierra ahora es el Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre de Vieques, administrado por el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de los EE. UU. Todas las playas en esa área aún conservan los nombres dados por la Marina, incluídas playa Roja (Red Beach), playa Azul (Blue Beach) y playa Verde (Green Beach).

Para más información, visite https://enciclopediapr.org/encyclopedia/municipio-de-vieques/, información provista por la Fundación Puertorriqueña de las Humanidades. Consulte también este excelente artículo sobre las playas en Vieques, escrito por el blogger Jeremy de Pittsburgh, PA, (en inglés) https://www.livingthedreamrtw.com/2017/01/vieques-beaches-to-visit.html.

Playa Sun Bay, Vieques, Puerto Rico

La playa Sun Bay es un balneario administrado por el Programa de Parques Nacionales de Puerto Rico. Está ubicado en la costa sur. Esta es una playa con baños, duchas, mesas de picnic, buen espacio de estacionamiento y salvavidas (socorristas) en el personal. Solamente se permite acampar en esta playa (se requiere permiso). Hay muchas palmeras altas por todas partes. Esta playa tiene una hermosa arena blanca clara y aguas cristalinas. La playa tiene un área con sogas (cuerdas), para que sea más segura para los visitantes que desean disfrutar del agua.

Playa Esperanza, Vieques, Puerto Rico

La playa Esperanza se encuentra en la costa sur, al oeste de Sun Bay. Esta playa es favorito de los residentes locales, ya que a los niños les encanta saltar del muelle cercano al agua. La arena, como en Sun Bay, es de color blanco claro y el agua también es cristalina.

Playa Sea Glass (Cofi), Vieques, Puerto Rico

La playa Sea Glass (también conocida como playa Cofi) se encuentra en la costa norte, en el área de la Bahía de Mulas. Tiene algunas rocas grandes alrededor en la arena. También tiene muchas hermosas piedras de vidrio, mezcladas con piedras de roca, a lo largo de la orilla de la playa. La arena, mezclada con las piedras, es de color amarillo dorado. El agua, como las otras playas de Vieques, es cristalina.

Playa Media Luna, Vieques, Puerto Rico

La playa Media Luna se encuentra en la costa sur, al este de Sun Bay. Se llama media luna debido a la forma de la bahía donde se encuentra. Esta playa es otra favorita entre los residentes locales, y es otra hermosa playa. Como las demás, tiene una hermosa arena blanca clara y agua cristalina. La orilla poco profunda permite a los bañistas disfrutar de un agradable día en el agua.

Playa Negra (Black Sand), Vieques, Puerto Rico

La playa Negra (Black Sand) se encuentra en la costa suroeste, al oeste de Esperanza. Lo particular de esta playa es que la arena es de un color negro oscuro mezclado con amarillo dorado. Esto se debe a que el cercano Monte Pirata tiene material volcánico que se llega al mar cuando llueve. La arena luego toma el color oscuro, mezclado con arena amarilla dorada. Para llegar a esta playa, hay una pequeña caminata. El agua es cristalina, pero no es segura para los nadadores ya que las corrientes de marea del Mar Caribe son fuertes aquí.

Atardecer en playa Sea Glass, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Como mencioné anteriormente, ha sido una tarea difícil elegir sólo diez playas, cinco de cada isla. Si tienes la oportunidad de visitar estas hermosas playas, ¡aprovéchala! Yo he perdido muchas oportunidades, ya que vivo en Florida y la mayoría de mis viajes a Puerto Rico son para visitar a familiares. Las playas son lugares increíbles para poder admirar la naturaleza, incluso si no les gusta meterse en el agua o no le gustan las multitudes en la playa. Todavía hay muchos lugares escondidos que, te prometo, te sorprenderán. Estoy soñando con visitar pronto. Es hora de mi tacita de café. ¡Salud!

For English version https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/08/04/my-beautiful-puerto-rico:-beaches-of-culebra-and-vieques/

My Beautiful Puerto Rico: Beaches of Culebra and Vieques

The beautiful island of Puerto Rico is in an amazing and unique location in the Caribbean area. The Atlantic Ocean borders its north coast, and the Caribbean Sea borders its south coast. It has warm weather, no snow, and breathtaking views.

Even though Puerto Rico is considered an island, it’s actually an archipielago (a group of island close together). It includes 143 small islands, islets and cays. The islands of Mona and Monito are in the west, and Vieques, Culebra, Culebrita, and Palomino islands are in the east.

The islands of Culebra and Vieques are bigger in size than the other islands. Both are towns, with municipal government. Culebra has a population of about 1,800 and Vieques has about 9,300 residents, according to the data of the 2010 Census. All of the smaller islands have no population. Culebra is smaller in size that Vieques, and it’s located north of Vieques.

I have to confess that I’ve never been to Culebra or Vieques. Yes, I intend to visit soon. As I keep learning about these two beautiful islands and their beaches, the more interested I become.

Okay, so how do we get there? Well, there are two ferries departing every day to both islands, one is a passenger-only ferry and one is a cargo ferry. The cargo ferry is for cars, but mostly for residents, because rental companies in Puerto Rico put restrictions on insuring cars taken outside the mainland.

To take the ferry, there’s a port in the town of Ceiba. Ferries used to provide service from Fajardo, but operations were moved to Ceiba in 2018. They travel about 4 times a day to both islands. There are also charter flights that go to both island, as they both have airports.

These two islands have some of the most beautiful beaches of the Caribbean, but also of the world. I have picked 10 beaches, 5 from each island, for this post. This has not been an easy task. All their beaches are beautiful!

Map of Culebra, courtesy of Google Earth Maps

Culebra is about 22 miles east of Fajardo. It’s best known as “la Isla Chiquita”. There are about 1,800 residents living in this island, according to data from the 2010 Census. There are about 111 named beaches on its coast. The coast is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean. The island has a small airport, and a port for ferry transportation by sea every day. To inquire about camping requisites and permits, contact the Culebra Conservation and Development Authority.

For more information, visit https://enciclopediapr.org/en/encyclopedia/culebra-municipality/, information provided by the Puerto Rico Endowment for the Humanities. Also check this great article about Culebra’s beaches from The Travel Channel here https://www.travelchannel.com/interests/beaches/articles/culebra-island-puerto-rico.

Flamenco Beach, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Flamenco Beach is the most beautiful of all of Culebra, and possibly of all of Puerto Rico. It’s in the northwest side of the island. It has been selected several times as one of the top 10 beaches in the world. Its sand is of a light white color, and its water is crystal clear. It’s so clear, that a variety of blue-green tones can be seen throughout the day. There are restrooms and showers available. Camping is permitted in this beach (permission required).

Tamarindo Grande Beach, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Tamarindo Grande Beach is in the southwest side, very close to Flamenco. It takes about 20 minutes walking from one beach to the other. They’re separated by the Flamenco Peninsula, where the Culebra National Reserve is located. There’s a wildlife refuge in the reserve area, protected by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources. This beach has some spots of sands that are of light white color and some spots that are of golden yellow color. There are plenty of pebbles throughout the beach, because of the abundance of coral reefs in this area. Water is crystal clear. The Luis Peña Bay is visible from this beach.

Datiles Beach, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Datiles Beach is a hidden gem. It’s in the southwest side of the island. It’s not a popular beach, but it’s a beautiful one to visit. This one has a shallow shore, water stays mostly calm with almost no waves, making it perfect for kids to bathe. Sand is very light, almost of white color, and water is crystal clear. It’s also perfect for camping, but there are no restroom facilities here.

Zoni (Soni) Beach, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Zoni Beach (known also as Soni) is in the northeast side of Culebra. From Zoni, the islands of St. Thomas and Tortola are visible in the distance. It has plenty of tall palm trees to enjoy some shadow. There are no restrooms on this beach. There might be areas restricted during turtle nesting season. The waves here are more active than in other beaches, so swimming is not very safe. There are no lifeguards around, always proceed with caution.

Tortuga Beach, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Tortuga Beach is located on the northwest side of Culebrita, Culebra’s largest cay. Its named “tortuga” or turtle because of the many turtles that are spotted on this beach, from leatherbacks to hawksbill, coming here for nesting or feeding. The beach is beautiful, as all of Culebra’s beaches, the sand is light white and the water is crystal clear. There are no facilities at all on this cay. There is a lighthouse, that remains closed for repairs. There are many hiking trails open to public, but there are no lifeguards or safety personnel here.

Map of Vieques, courtesy of Google Earth Maps

Vieques is about 8 miles from Ceiba. It’s best known as “la Isla Nena”. There are about 9,300 residents living in this island, according to data from the 2010 Census. There are about 172 named beaches on its coast. The coast is bordered by the Caribbean Sea. There is also a bioluminiscent bay in Vieques, Mosquito Bay, which I’ll write about in another post. The island also has a small airport, and a port for ferry transportation by sea every day.

The US Navy had facilities, and bombing practice areas, in over two thirds of land in the island until 2003. That land is now the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge, administered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. All the beaches in that area still retain the names given by the Navy, including Red Beach, Blue Beach and Green Beach. 

For more information visit https://enciclopediapr.org/en/encyclopedia/vieques-municipality/, information provided by the Puerto Rico Endowment for the Humanities. Also check this great article about beaches in Vieques, written by blogger Jeremy from Pittsburgh, PA, (in English) https://www.livingthedreamrtw.com/2017/01/vieques-beaches-to-visit.html.

Sun Bay Beach, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Sun Bay Beach is a “balneario” (bathing spot) administered by the Puerto Rico National Parks Program. It’s located in the south coast. This is a beach with restrooms, showers, picnic tables, good parking space, and lifeguards on staff. Camping is only permitted on this beach (permit required). There are many tall palm trees all around. This beach has beautiful light white sand and crystal clear water. The beach has a roped area, to make it safer for visitors who want to enjoy the water.

Esperanza Beach, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Esperanza Beach is located in the south coast, to the west of Sun Bay Beach. This is a locals’ favorite, as kids love to jump off the pier nearby into the water. The sand, as Sun Bay, is of light white color and the water is also crystal clear.

Sea Glass (Cofi) Beach, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Sea Glass Beach (also known as Cofi Beach) is located in the north coast, in the Mulas Bay area. It has some big rocks all around in the sand. It also has many beautiful sea glass pebbles, mixed with rock pebbles, all along the beach shore. The sand, mixed with the pebbles, is of golden yellow color. The water, as the other beaches in Vieques, is crystal clear.

Media Luna Beach, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Media Luna Beach is located in the south coast, to the east of Sun Bay. It’s called “media luna” (half moon) because of the shape of the bay where it’s located. This is another local’s favorite, and another beautiful beach. As the others, it has beautiful light white sand and crystal clear water. The shallow shore allows bathers to enjoy a nice day in the water.

Black Sand Beach, Vieques, Puerto Rico

Black Sand Beach is located in the southwest coast, to the west of Esperanza. What’s particular about this beach is that the sand is of a dark black color mixed with golden yellow. This is because the nearby Mount Pirata (peak) has volcanic material that gets washed to the sea when it rains. The sand then takes the dark color mixed in with golden yellow sand. To get to this beach, there is a bit of a hike. The water is crystal clear, but it’s not safe for swimmers as tide currents of the Caribbean Sea are strong here.

Sunset at Sea Glass Beach, Vieques, Puerto Rico

As I mentioned above, it has been a difficult task to pick only ten beaches, five from each island. If you have the opportunity to visit these beautiful beaches, take advantage of it! I have missed the chances, as I live in Florida and most of my travels to Puerto Rico are to visit family. Beaches are amazing places to admire nature, even if you don’t like to get in the water, or you don’t like beach crowds. There are still many secluded places that, I promise, will amaze you. I am dreaming of visiting soon. Time for my tacita de café. Salud!

Para versión en Español vea https://fullofcoffee.blog/2019/08/04/mi-hermoso-puerto-rico:-playas-de-culebra-y-vieques/